Cancel the LSAT?

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Congratulations on Finishing the LSAT Today!
Now, for those of you thinking about canceling your score see these previous posts:

Thinking About Cancelling Your LSAT Score
Whether to cancel your LSAT score.

For details about how to cancel your LSAT score see LSAC.org.

Here are the basics from their web site:

We must receive a signed fax or overnight letter with your request within six calendar days of the test. If you do not receive confirmation of receipt of your request within four calendar days after your request was submitted, contact LSAC immediately. If your request has not been processed, you may submit proof that your request was received at LSAC within the required period. Documentation of proof of receipt will not be accepted beyond 14 calendar days after the test. You can also cancel your score at the test center if you are absolutely certain you want to cancel your score.


28 thoughts on “Cancel the LSAT?

  1. Angry Anny on said:

    Hi Ann:

    I took the LSAT today, and I have to say I felt as though I lost all those months of preparation. I felt pressured for time, could not finish the sections, even though I was able to do so on practice tests with the same time constraints. I had planned to apply to Columbia Law early decision, but with these scores I have a feeling I need to apply to schools much lower on the list. I am a grad from West Point, with a 2.92 GPA with probably now an LSAT score of 155-160. I was just wondering if you had any advice.

  2. Ann K. Levine, Esq. on said:

    If you really feel this way tomorrow, when a new day begins, then cancel your score and take the test in December. Missing early decision is nothing to get upset about. Missing out on achieving a score that more truly reflects your potential is worth doing something about. Good luck, and please let me know if I can help in any way.

  3. Ann,
    I took the test for the first time today also, if I cancel this score and take the december one, wont they publish on the report that i cancelled this score? and if I did……how to law schools look at a cancelled score? Also not to be rude, but do you think it is possible to get into Columbia law with a 2.92 GPA and a score of 155-160?

  4. Ann K. Levine, Esq. on said:

    I think it’s highly unlikely, but i really don’t know anything else about you and I try to stay away from giving schools advice in the blog format since I do not have the same information about you that I would about my clients. If you’d like an initial consultation, please contact me through http://www.lawschoolexpert.com

  5. Hi Ann,
    I will be sure to go to the website. But my first question was if a cancelled score looks bad on a score report. For example there is a cancelled score and then one official score. Do law schools look down on it?

  6. Ann K. Levine, Esq. on said:

    One canceled score is NO big deal. Seriously. Not a big deal. Doesn’t even necessarily require any explanation in the application. There is no penalty for a canceled score in my mind; no one will care.

  7. starshine on said:

    Hi Ann,

    I’m so glad you have this site! Well, I took the LSAT on Sat Oct 4 and do not have a good feeling about it. I had a 155 on a recent Kaplan practice test (did not take their prep course though). Since I guessed at 1/2 of the logic games on that practice test, and then spent 2 weeks studying them, I thought I’d get at least a 160 on the real test. BUT on the LSAT exam I got stuck on one logic game, lost track of time, and had to blindly guess on 3/4 of the 23 logic game questions. So, unless I miraculously do great on all of the other sections, I figure my LSAT score will be around 150 max. I know law schools will take the higher score if I retake the test, but I still think a low score will look bad and give them pause. Am I right about that? Should I cancel my score? And should I retake the test in December regardless? I wonder if that is too late for me to have a good chance at getting in to law school for fall 2008.

    FYI – I’m in my late 40s and would be applying as an older student (I read your blogs about that). I have an MBA and over 15 yrs of corporate experience, but have been off that track for a bit; I’ve worked for the past 2 years as a writer. I am only looking to get into a school ranked 50-100 or below – but even that looks tough with such an LSAT score. I appreciate your advice – thank you!

  8. Ann K. Levine, Esq. on said:

    In your situation, the deciding factor would probably depend upon how much you prepared for this LSAT. If you prepared steadily for 2-3 months, then I might tell you to see how this score turns out. But, if you didn’t and if you have time to dedicate yourself to the December test, then canceling might work in your favor. Even though the higher score matters, it sounds like you completely botched one section and that is a bit different than just walking out of the test feeling low. There is no perfect answer, and it partially depends upon whether the low 150s score would get you in the running at the schools you hope to attend.

  9. starshine on said:

    Hi Ann,

    Thank you so much for the response. Let’s say I retake the test. I wonder – are Dec LSAT scores released in Jan too late (for serious consideration) for fall 2008 admission? I ask because of the rolling admissions most law schools have.

  10. Hi Ann,

    I took the LSAT this past Saturday but came down with a case of the flu Friday afternoon (very bad luck on my part). Because of my illness I don’t have a very clear recollection of my performance on the test. (I think my score will range anywhere between a 155 – 165)I am thinking about canceling and retaking the test in December. However, I have a slight problem. I took the test in December of 2007 and canceled at that time (I was diagonosed with uterine cancer a few days before the test and took the test anyway thinking that I would not be distracted – but I was very wrong). I wanted to apply to a tier 1 school (my GPA is 3.95) and on former diagonostic LSATs I was scoring from 168 – 175. Will law school admission committes look down upon my canceled LSATs? Or do you think I should I risk a low score and not retake the LSAT?

  11. Ann K. Levine, Esq. on said:

    If your third score (after 2 cancels) is in the high 160s-low 170s range, then it’ll just look like you’re a perfectionist and the score will be the only thing that matters. Really.

  12. Hi Ann,

    Thanks so much! You’ve really taken a load off of my mind! One more question if you don’t mind though..do you think I should file an addendum explaining my cancelations or should I just let my score speak for itself?

  13. Hi, what a great site you have! I took the LSAT last year and scored a 159, applied to only one school and was wait listed and obviously not accepted 🙁
    However I took the LSAT again on Saturday, after having taking a Powerscore course, and consistently scoring around 170. My dilema is that I could not sleep the night before the test and woke up at 2am to never go back to sleep. I feel as though I could have done well just not sure, usually I know if I got an answer right, and this time I was just to tired to be sure.
    Should I cancel and retake? Or just wait it out and retake if I don’t get what I want? Especially since most schools take the highest score now? I am not trying to get into Harvard, but I would like to go to a top 30 school.

  14. Anonymous on said:

    Hi Ann:

    I took the LSAT on October 5th overseas, and am debating whether or not to cancel my score. I didn’t panic during the test or mess up seriously on a section, although I did run out of time for the last 4 questions on a possible experimental LR section. My main insecurity comes from the fact that on practice exams, my score ranged from 159-168 (median 166). Does this fluctuation indicate insufficient preparation? If so, would you recommend that I cancel my score and try again in Dec. or even put off applications till next year? How much preparation is enough preparation? Thank you so much for your advice.

  15. Ann K. Levine, Esq. on said:

    Hi Jeff,
    Thanks for reading.
    Only you can judge whether you were able to perform with the lack of sleep, but I’m leaning toward keeping the score and then deciding about December.

  16. Ann K. Levine, Esq. on said:

    Dear Anonymous,
    Your fluctuation in scores seems normal to me (you have to account for harder and easier tests, good and bad days, etc.).
    I think you’ve prepared enough when you are hitting a 5-8 point range pretty consistently and not still making great improvements with each practice test. However, I am not an LSAT tutor so I don’t want to commit too much to that theory.
    I think 2-3 months of solid prep is good… Whatever that means to you.

  17. Dumb question: What’s the fax number for sending a request to cancel (having trouble finding it on lsac.org), and what does the letter have to say, besides please cancel and our LSAC account number? Thanks!

  18. Anonymous on said:

    Hi Ann:

    I have a bit of a complex LSAT story. Before the LSAT, for several practice tests I was scoring from the low to mid 170s consistently. However, in the final 2 weeks leading up until test day my scores nosedived to 162, 158 and 154 respectively. I attributed these scores to pretest anxiety.

    I managed to get one more test in before the Oct 4th administration and scores in the upper 160s… still a bit discouraging (relative to em past performances).

    In any case, I felt fairly confident going into the test room, but once I sat down and the scores were being distributed I began to lose the feeling in my limbs… both my heart and mind were racing. Anyway, I managed to plough through the test, answering all but a few questions (maybe 3 or 4 half guesses the entire test). I know I was answering questions elss methodically and more intuitively than I normally had on practice tests. But, after the test it seemed like a blur to me. I barely remember more than 20% of the questions I answered (I was in a bit of a trance the entire test) and I feel like I can’t really judge my performance ex post.

    Is this a normal irrational post LSAT phobia, or should I consider cancelling?

  19. Ann K. Levine, Esq. on said:

    Hi,
    I can’t say what’s ‘normal’ for you in terms of test anxiety, but -yes- what your describing is normal for many people who take the exam. Why don’t you see what your score is and then see whether you’d be happy with your school choices with that score?
    Ann

  20. Anonymous on said:

    Hi Ann,
    I took the LSAT for the second time last Saturday (I got a 156 in December 2007), and I messed up 2 logic games sections. I’ve been consistantly scoring in the low 160’s on my practice tests, but I think this time I might have gotten under 160 again. I’m pretty sure I would be able to get my score to 165 by December, since the LG section’s the only part I need to work on. I’m thinking about canceling. Would it look bad if I had a really low score, a cancellation, and a score hopefully in the mid 160’s this December? Would law schools care, and more importantly, do you think I would still have a chance in the admissions cycle if I take the test in December? Thanks so much!

  21. Ann K. Levine, Esq. on said:

    You can keep the score or cancel – and taking the December test has served people very well – you can submit applications before then and just have schools waiting for your score. It’s worth waiting for that 165 : )

  22. I took the LSAT in October and got a 169- and then I retook it today, and I think I did quite terrible. I want to go to a top ten school. Will they look down on those reports if my second score was worse than my first? Should I be looking into canceling todays test?

  23. Ann K. Levine, Esq. on said:

    Bk,
    If you think you did worse than the 169, stick with the 169 and apply today. If your grades are strong and your application materials are great, you’re still looking at Top 10 schools. Apply now – get considered now without the schools having to wait for the Dec LSAT score to evaluate the application.
    Ann

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