Big LSAT Changes Ahead!

Wow. It’s been a busy month at LSAC. I went on vacation to celebrate my 15th wedding anniversary and then all hell broke loose. But it’s good news for applicants all around. First, there is now no longer a restriction regarding the number of times you can take the LSAT. Take it as many times as you wish! Second, in 2018-2019 there will be 6 opportunities to take the LSAT! That’s right- 6 instead of 4!

Here are the dates:

  • June 11, 2018
  • September 8, 2018
  • November 17, 2018
  • January 26, 2019
  • March 30, 2019
  • June 3, 2019

More opportunities to take the LSAT is good for applicants, but there will be less time to prepare between each test, so people may need to plan ahead and register for the next exam just in case they decide to re-take the test after seeing their score.

Also, the first digital version of the LSAT was tested this month. It wasn’t scored, but other than some uncooperative tablet stylus functioning, people had good things to say. Hopefully the LSAT will be joining us in contemporary times soon.

Of course, all of this happened after I’d finished recording the audio version of the 3rd Edition of The Law School Admission Game, due to be released in a few weeks! Watch for free releases of segments of the book on podcast during the month of June, and the print and e-book versions to be released in Mid-July.

11 thoughts on “Big LSAT Changes Ahead!

  1. Will on said:

    I sat for the June LSAT. In the 3 wks. prior to the test, I scored 170, 166, 167, 169, and 174, in that order, on various prep tests, typically finishing each section 3 – 7 mins. ahead of time. I remember doing one LR section in 26:50 and missing only one.
    Here’s what I can tell you about the LSAT:

    This test is definitely harder than the prep tests.
    I finished one LR section before five minutes was called. Another section, I finished a little over two mins. ahead of time. The LG section was close, and I guessed on the last four questions, but had time to check two of them (this is typically my best section).
    One LR section I marked one question, and another I marked three, to come back to check later. I didn’t change my answers, except for one, but these were very tough questions.

    Unless you’re consistently finishing prep tests with four or more minutes to spare, you’re going to have issues with time on the test. Count on it.

  2. pamela on said:

    Hi,
    I just got my score from my 1st LSAT 147 and my gap is 3.059. I am going into my senior year and hoping to bump up my gpa to 3,15- 3.20. Should I be happy with this score and apply or should I retake the Lsat in September? Presently I am taking 2 on line classes and feel very comfortable stating I will recieve A’s in the classes. Which should get my gpa to 3.1, I would like to stay in the midwest. Suggestion

    • Hi Pamela, Whether you should be happy with your score depends on (1) your potential for improving the score and (2) where you hope to go to law school.
      I’m sorry I didn’t see your post earlier, but hope my response is still timely.

  3. Ebonee on said:

    Hi! Does this apply to people who registered for the June 2017 LSAT or is this only for those who register for the LSAT after the June 2017 test. I have heard mixed feedback.

  4. Hi Ann,

    Thank you so much for all of your helpful blog posts!

    I am taking the December LSAT and hopefully applying to law school this cycle. My GPA is 3.9 from a top university, I am not US-born, and I have a very unique/diverse background which is incorporated into my PS. I couldn’t seem to break out of the 165-167 range in my lsat score so I decided to withdraw September and take in December. I truly feel that I can improve from that range in the months ahead.

    I’ve read your previous blog posts about the increase in score being worth the late application. However, those blog posts seemed to be based on the fact that law school apps were in decline for a while. I’ve heard that there is supposed to be a spike this cycle. Did I make a fatal mistake? Am I better off waiting until next cycle? I am aiming for top 6 schools.

    • Hanna, you made a good mistake if you feel you can bring your LSAT up – I stand by my previous advice. You don’t need to wait for next cycle. It’s true that, of the T-6, HLS shows a preference for earlier applicants but you should see no difference among the others.

  5. Hi Ann,
    Thank you for writing The Law School Admission Game. I have read it straight through and reviewed a few sections over again. It is a great resource. I’m looking for a little extra advice. I have a 3.6 cumulative GPA and I received a disappointing 144 on my February 2018 LSAT. According to the school stats their median LSAT for the fall 2016 was 155 and the median GPA was 3.42. I have a great letter of recommendation from a professor. I’ve also worked for three years as a paralegal. The school does not close application process until July 15th this year. Assuming they do not fill the seats prior to that, of course. Do you think it would be best to go ahead and apply now? Then if I get rejected retest and apply again next year? Or should I try taking the LSAT this June and try to squeeze in at the end.

    • I am so happy the book has been helpful! Sorry to hear about the LSAT… I think that most schools will have filled their classes by that point but you can try… I think it’s probably better to apply in the fall.

  6. Hello,

    I was dismissed from law school after my first semester (Spring 2018) due to a tragedy that happened a week before my finals. Hence, I entered my finals and didn’t do so well. I didn’t fail any classes but I fell below the GPA requirement. I have a 3.6 GPA undergrad (went to a prestigious university) and I took the LSAT got a 149. However, now that i have time I will be studying hard to get somewhere around 155-160. What are my chances of getting into a law school after dismissal ( I have medical notes as to what happened). PLEASE advice on reapplying will most law schools reject me due to poor grades even though it was due to health conditions?

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